Many people presume that judges issue rulings in court based simply on the facts at hand, without public opinion playing any role at all.  However, history tells us that how judges read laws and constitutions very much reflects where public opinion is (or, at least, what they think the public will accept).   Leading up to the final Supreme Court marriage victory, Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg said in an interview that “there hasn’t been any major change…in which there wasn’t a groundswell among the people before the Supreme Court put its stamp of approval on the inclusion in the equality concept of people who were once left out.” 

The Fair Housing Program helps any person who has been discriminated against in the rental, sale, financing or appraisal of housing. The state and federal Fair Housing Act prohibits discrimination because of a person’s race, color, national origin, religion, sex, disability (mental or physical), or familial status. For Austin residents, additional protections include marital status, sexual orientation, gender identity, age, or status as a student.
Kill them with kindness. “Be nice to everyone in the courtroom. Kindness makes the world a better place, and it makes you a happier person. But if that’s not enough to convince you, consider this: Kindness makes you more likely to win your case. When jurors think you’re a good person, they’ll give you the benefit of the doubt and ascribe good motives to what you say. If they think you’re nasty or dishonest, they’ll discount everything that comes out of your mouth.

Unless you are going to Small Claims Court without an attorney, if you are taking this case to court to save money or get a big payoff, it won't happen. A good example is taking a non-compete agreement case to court. After many months, perhaps years, of litigation on whether the non-compete is reasonable and whether the other party breached your non-compete agreement, the only people who win are the attorneys.
Women in Need of Change, or WIN Court, is the opportunity for chronic women offenders to invest in themselves and their future. WIN Court is a trauma-responsive court that addresses the behaviors of chronic women offenders arrested in the city of Las Vegas. WIN Court focuses on the individual’s core issues in relationship to trauma and co-occurring mental health behaviors. These traumas contribute to their choices of substance abuse, criminal activity and recidivism. The program offers each individual woman a toolbox to address past traumas in order to move forward to a future of exciting new choices. In a safe environment, the program builds on trust and respect to be able to identify the trauma, employ strategies to normalize the symptoms and manage the related triggers and their reactions. WIN Court addresses chronic women offenders who have amassed misdemeanor offenses within the jurisdiction of the city of Las Vegas change their lives. The participants volunteer to enter into an 18-month to 24-month commitment. The basic requirements may include:
Lawsuits can become additionally complicated as more parties become involved (see joinder). Within a "single" lawsuit, there can be any number of claims and defenses (all based on numerous laws) between any number of plaintiffs or defendants. Each of these participants can bring any number of cross claims and counterclaims against each other, and even bring additional parties into the suit on either side after it progresses. In reality however, courts typically have some power to sever claims and parties into separate actions if it is more efficient to do so. A court can do this if there is not a sufficient overlap of factual issues between the various associates, separating the issues into different lawsuits.
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