A traditional eBook usually looks like a textbook chapter: It’s got an introduction, a list of sections, and a lot of text that follows a linear progression of concepts designed to be read in order. There’s usually some kind of summary conclusion at the end. This structure has worked with print for years. But it’s not a structure that translates well to the web.
It also looks up to date – the layout and interface are much more accessible than those of some competitors. Lucidpress is an online program, so you don’t download it, and you store your projects in the cloud. Some may see it as a downside to need internet access to work on projects, but it’s fairly common practice nowadays. You can sign up for a free trial on Lucidpress’ site, and you can even access the software for free if you’re a student or teacher. However, the program’s project variety is what really makes it a great option. It includes publishing formats for business reporting as well as those to help educators make learning material more engaging. There’s also a space to create personal projects like family photo albums and picture books. The service makes it easy to add images and sound to your work.

Only problem? Your not too 'savvy' in the design creation department! You've tinkered with Canva, Adobe Pages, and other eBook creation platforms such as Beacon, and the end results are, well... lets just say "less than desirable!" - I know, design is just not your thing! And now, finishing off your eBook has turned into a massive struggle, instead of being the rush of excitement it should be!
Anything. Well, within reason. Ebooks are simply a marketer's way of delivering lots of critical information in a form their potential customers are most willing to read it. An environmental company might write an ebook all about water conservation. They also might focus an ebook entirely on how their water-saving product is used, or how it helped a customer solve a problem. Discover more ebook ideas at the end of this article.
The service connects with the major eBook publishers, Amazon and Barnes and Noble, as well as with their respective Kindle and Nook formats. It also lets you format content for mobile devices, which is useful if you publish online. The service comes equipped with all the formats and features you need to make online content look good. You can embed videos and photos in articles and combine template types, though you might find this a bit challenging if you’ve never done it before. Atavist also does a decent check of your work to prevent errors in the uploading process. What sets Atavist apart are the customization options it has that other online publication services, like Facebook’s Instant Articles, don’t. For example, you can select a tailored transition for the pages in your eBook. Atavist also walks you through how to protect your work, allowing you to select whether the book is for profit or free to the public. There’s tons of in-program support to help you figure out how to use all the features, which is another reason it’s the overall best eBook software we tested.
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