In recent years, space food has been used by various nations engaging on space programs as a way to share and show off their cultural identity and facilitate intercultural communication. Although astronauts consume a wide variety of foods and beverages in space, the initial idea from The Man in Space Committee of the Space Science Board in 1963 was to supply astronauts with a formula diet that would supply all the needed vitamins and nutrients.[58]

You've heard to make breakfast the biggest meal of your day, but you may not be that hungry when you wake up. In fact, "your biggest meal should be around noon when your digestion is at its peak and you can feed your body when it actually needs fuel," says Dr. Lipman. That means you don't need a huge meal at dinner only to sit and catch up on True Detective and then go to bed. But "big" doesn't mean burger and fry big. At lunch, emphasize protein and greens, like a hearty bowl of lentil soup and kale salad. Another bonus: after dinner you won't have the feeling you need to unbutton your pants.

Eat like a tourist in Greece. The sunset over your office park isn't as stunning as the one over an Aegean beach, but a plate of grilled fish and fresh vegetables and a glass of wine is as delicious in Athens, Georgia, as it is in Athens, Greece. All the heart-healthy fats, minerals, and antioxidants in Mediterranean foods like hummus, olive oil, and feta can help lower your risk for heart disease, says Susan Mitchell, Ph.D., coauthor of Fat Is Not Your Fate (Fireside).
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Turns out, healthy gluten-free food doesn’t have to be boring. Picnik, founded by Naomi Seifter, offers a menu with the best ingredients (conscious meats, wild-caught fish, pasture-raised eggs) that are all safe for those intolerant of gluten, peanuts, corn, or soy. There are two trailers on South Lamar and Cesar Chavez open until 3pm each day for grab-and-go & butter coffee, as well as a brick-and mortar on Burnet Road open for breakfast, lunch, dinner, and great craft/classic cocktails. We’re into the (gluten-free!) breakfast tacos, salted caramel banana pancakes made with cassava batter, chicken tenders made with rice flour, cashew queso, Thai red curry with grass-fed steak, and the new turmeric-crusted cauliflower steak.

James Beard Award-winning chef Aaron Franklin and his meat wizardry have become famous all over the country, attracting tourists and locals alike to happily wait in line for a taste of the magic. Franklin’s smoked meats are the most tender, juicy, and flavorful around, and taste especially great after four hours of beer drinking and chatting in line! Try the brisket (duh), pulled pork, and ribs for the holy trinity of Franklin’s smoked meats.

Eating a healthy diet doesn’t have to be overly complicated. While some specific foods or nutrients have been shown to have a beneficial effect on mood, it’s your overall dietary pattern that is most important. The cornerstone of a healthy diet pattern should be to replace processed food with real food whenever possible. Eating food that is as close as possible to the way nature made it can make a huge difference to the way you think, look, and feel.

“Research has shown that people who are into clean living are more about being healthy as a way of preventing disease, rather than looking to overcome one,” Greely says. “I’ve seen people eliminate wheat from their diet only to find their arthritis goes away, and others who’ve suffered hay fever their whole lives suddenly don’t have so much as a sniffle in spring.”
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